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  1. #1
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    Thumbs up A Clarion for My Beloved Pashtuns

    My Beloved Pashtuns:

    The last two years have been among the worst this Pashtun generation has ever faced. We lost thousands, if not more, of Pashtun, and it did not just start last year; it has been happening for quite a while now. We have been slaughtered, bombed, and maimed. Our properties, both public and private, have been destroyed. Our children have been denied the right to education, play, and even fresh and clean air. Our women have been harassed, tortured – both physically and mentally – raped, and butchered. Our progress and development have been blocked, and we are constantly being pushed towards the ages of darkness.

    But have any of us been doing anything about it, whether as individuals or as groups? I don’t mean just prayers; I mean real action – which could be in any form. For example, arranging and/or participating in rallies against our genocide; writing to important news sources, online as well as print media, to give us full coverage in their news; arranging and participating in talks about Pashtuns to raise awareness about our sufferings; contacting humanitarian organizations to help us with foods, water, shelters, etc.; and doing whatever else we may have thought was important during our time of anguish. The problem is that many of us stayed healthy and in peace in our houses outside our war-torn land while our mothers became widows and our children became orphans in Pashtun lands, and this continues to happen on a daily basis. There’s nothing wrong with our being healthy ourselves, of course, but something goes wrong when we ignore our oppressed people back home.

    Pashtuns have the potential to be geniuses; our great, honorable leaders of the past have proven that to us. We are an intelligent breed, and we can do so much for our own people as well as for the rest of the world if we try, but I am disappointed to see that most of us are not making any effort to help solve the dilemmas that are polluting our Pashtun soil. We abroad are doctors, lawyers, businessmen/businesswomen, professors, teachers, engineers, etc., but what we should be focusing on is: what good has our being so successful abroad done for Pashtuns in Pashtunkhwa and Afghanistan? I have actually started believing that it doesn’t matter how educated we are and that education should not be measured by the amount of years we go to school, but it should instead be measured on how well we can use that education to do something productive for humanity, to bring a positive change in a place where it is severely needed. And as they say, charity begins at home – which, for us, is our Pashtun brothers and sister. If we haven't done anything for our people, I believe that we are worth nothing no matter what our profession is and how successful we may think we are. What is the purpose of education if it is not used to serve those in need? Unfortunately, quite a number of us tend to complain about the status of Pashtuns but are not providing any helpful remedies. We already know what problems we have, but we need solutions and action, not to hear anymore sad complaints from our own Pashtuns.

    We all should be asking ourselves how we can make a difference in our lands. If our people are uneducated and poor, what have we done about it? What have we done to better our status nationally and internationally? We study abroad, we work abroad, we live abroad, but what good has any of it done to our people who are stuck in a land seized by the clutches war?

    Let us unite together and recognize our problems, discuss them with other Pashtuns, and figure out ways to bring us back to life. Let us make our language a priority among all the other languages we are living with, including English; let us not give our children the option of speaking either English or Pashto at home but practically forbid the usage of other languages in our homes so that they will learn Pashto. They are guaranteed to learn English – the current international language – as they grow up, anyway, and they can learn other languages on the way as well, but Pashto is our identity, and we must not let it be forgotten. In fact, if I may have the honor to admit so, I believe we should refrain from calling ourselves Pashtuns if we do not know our language.

    Let us emphasize education and head on towards various different fields, instead of limiting ourselves to just one or two. We need variety, and having Pashtuns involved in many different professions will be useful in solving the problems that we face in many arenas of life.

    Let us heavily focus on educating ourselves, other Pashtuns, and especially our youth about our history, our culture, our heritage, and the importance of all of these. Too many of us are proud of who we are, but do we know why? We need to ask ourselves what makes us a proud race, and if we cannot explain it to ourselves or to someone else, then that is a mighty sad sign that we lack knowledge about our own people. We have a beautiful history, and we should make sure to pass it on to our children so it can be kept alive; so our later generations avoid repeating the mistakes that we are making today or made in the past; so that we can successfully move towards a healthy future for ourselves, knowing that we are carving our footprints in the stones of our present while studying those of our past.

    It is time to act and time to wake up. It is time to get united. It is time for us to use all our energy to help our Pashtun brothers and sisters in this time of depression. It is time to provide support in any way possible to our oppressed people in need. It is time to write, to get involved, to donate, to help, to provide support, and to do anything else we can to get ourselves out of our miseries.

    May peace and prosperity be upon us all along with the rest of humanity; may we be successful in using our means, knowledge, and time in helping those who need us when they need us. Aameen!
    Last edited by Qrratugai; 10-20-2009 at 02:46 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qrratugai
    My Beloved Pashtuns:

    Last year, as well as part of this year, was one of the worst years the Pashtun generation has ever faced.
    the phrase PASHTUN GENERATION can be improved...by just saying Pashtuns or another better owrd in stead of GENERATION

    But did any of us do anything about it, whether as individuals or as groups?

    ANY ONE OF US .....AS INDIVIDUAL.../..INDIVIDUALLY OR COLLECTIVELY ....
    to give us full coverage in their news;

    TO GET FULL COVERAGE FOR US

    our sufferings; contacting humanitarian organizations to help us with foods, waters, shelters,

    FOOD, WATER, SHELTER

    while our mothers became widows and our children became orphans in Pukhtun lands –

    PASHTUN LANDS....ONE MAY USE PAKHTUN OR PASHTUN/BETTER PAXTUN ,,BUT ONE WAY THROUGH OUT ONE ARTICLE

    businessmen/businesswomen,

    JUST BUSINESS PERSON WOULD BE SUFFICIENT


    to bring a positive change where it is gravely needed.

    I AM NOT SURE WHETEHR THE WORD GRAVELY CAN BE USED IN POSITIVE SENSE
    I consider this section of KW , very importnat for writers
    we can suggest how we can improve further
    above is a samll effort which can be debated too
    on ideas of the post my comments next
    Last edited by Zahid Buneray; 03-17-2009 at 06:55 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by aimal khan

    I consider this section of KW , very importnat for writers
    we can suggest how we can improve further
    above is a samll effort which can be debated too
    on ideas of the post my comments next
    Wa, Aimala!! Khudey de zrra khushala ka!! Dera, dera manana for the corrections and suggestions; it means a lot. Gracias tanto, kha!
    Last edited by Zahid Buneray; 03-17-2009 at 06:56 AM.

  4. #4
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    Its really a clarion for Pashtuns. The writer has taken the Pashtun cause in a passionate way. Pashtuns must feel each other like one body and writers like Qrratugai is their herald. The harbinger is trying to awaken her group mates , Pashtuns from the slumber and urge that all the Pashtuns must feel pain of their other pashtun brothern and sisters and do some thing concrete to alleviate that pain and ameliorate the downtrodden conditions of Pashtuns.

    Dire need of the hour is creating and further strenghtening this sense of belongingness. Pashtuns are fortunate that their exist a sense of fraternity. All Pashtuns feel belonging to one extended family. Althu they are 70 million, but it seems every Pashtun is the cousen of the other. This is a great achievemnet on sentimental level. Now this sense of love and fraternity is to be cashed as emphasized by the writer above and all Pashtuns must get united for the Pashtun cause. The casuse for me is giving Pashtuns the status of an educated, modern, developed people without extremism, fanaticism, terrorism and other evils.

    This post must be widely circulated and can be used a starting point for unifying Pashtuns for Pashtun causes.

    The write -up can be further improved if other worthy members of KW commnet on the language and ideas.

  5. #5
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    What is important about the article is the passion as rightly pointed out by aimal khan. This passion and fervor is very important for any kind of propaganda.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qrratugai
    My Beloved Pashtuns:

    Last year, as well as part of this year, was one of the worst years the Pashtun generation has ever faced. We lost thousands, if not more, of Pashtun, and it did not start last year; it has been happening for quite a while now. We have been slaughtered, bombed, and maimed. Our properties, both public and private, have been destroyed. Our children have been denied the right to education, play, and even fresh and clean air. Our women have been harassed, tortured – both physically and mentally – raped, and butchered. Our progress and development have been blocked, and we are constantly being pushed towards the ages of darkness.

    But did any of us do anything about it, whether as individuals or as groups? Or do we continue doing so? I don’t mean just prayers; I mean real action – which could be in any form. For example, arranging and/or participating in rallies against our genocide; writing to important news sources, online as well as print media, to give us full coverage in their news; arranging and participating in talks about Pashtuns to raise awareness about our sufferings; contacting humanitarian organizations to help us with foods, waters, shelters, etc.; and doing whatever else we may have thought was important during our time of anguish. The problem is that many of us stayed healthy and in peace in our houses in the peaceful cities of Pakistan and in the rest of the world, while our mothers became widows and our children became orphans in Pukhtun lands – and this continues to happen on a daily basis. There’s nothing wrong with our being healthy ourselves, of course, and nothing makes me happier than knowing that my people are in peace. But something goes wrong when we ignore our oppressed people back home.

    Pashtuns have the potential to be geniuses. Our great and honorable leaders of the past have proven that to us. We are an intelligent breed, and we can do so much for our Pakhtuns and the rest of the world if we try, but I am disappointed to see that most of us are not making any effort to help solve the dilemmas that our precious people back home face. We abroad are doctors, lawyers, businessmen/businesswomen, professors, teachers, engineers, etc., but what we should be focusing on is: what good has our being so successful abroad done for our Pukhtuns in Pukhtunkhwa and Afghanistan? I have actually started believing that it doesn’t matter how educated we are and that education shouldn’t be measured by the amount of years we go to school and study whatever we want. I am convinced, however, that the only thing that matters is how we use our education to bring a positive change where it is desperately needed. If we haven't done anything for our people, I believe that we are worth nothing no matter what our profession is and how successful we may think we are.

    Hence, our education and success are of no use if we keep complaining about the status of your people and are not providing any practical solutions or doing anything positive ourselves. For instance, I might have my Master’s or even a PhD degree, or I might be a successful lawyer, doctor, businesswoman, or have some other respectable career, but how do I live with my title knowing that my own people are drowning in oppression and I am not doing anything to help them at all? As evil as this may sound, that makes me a useless person in my mind. The success of my business, or that of my any other professional career, means nothing to me; in fact, I would not even consider my self educated at all because I am not doing anything for my people who are in a great suffering. I should either help provide practical solutions to our problems, actually do something about the dilemmas we are facing currently and are bound to face in the near future, or then at lest just never complain about it. We already know what problems we have, but we need solutions and action, not to hear anymore sad complaints from our own Pukhtuns.

    We all should be asking ourselves how we can make a difference in our lands. If our people are uneducated and poor, what have we done about it? What have we done to better our status nationally and internationally? We study abroad, we work abroad, we live abroad, but what good has any of it done to our people back home? Or are we just going to let ourselves live and die on non-Pukhtun soils and ignore the miseries of our beloved people whom we have left behind on our sweet Pukhtun soil?

    Let us unite together and recognize our problems, discuss them with other Pukhtuns, and figure out ways to bring us back to life. Let us make our language a priority among all the other languages we are living with, including English; let us not give our children the option of speaking either English or Pukhto at home but practically forbid the usage of other languages in our homes so that they will learn Pukhto. They are guaranteed to learn English – the current international language – as they grow up, anyway, and they can learn other languages on the way as well, but Pukhto is our identity, our native language, and we cannot let it be forgotten. In fact, if I may have the honor to admit so, I believe we should refrain from calling ourselves Pashtuns if we don’t know our language.

    Let us also emphasize education – no, not ending it with high school; we should go beyond that, as far as we can afford it – and head on towards various different fields, instead of limiting ourselves to just the medical field (many parents forbid other fields upon their children; they need to realize how smothering that is). We need variety, and having Pukhtuns involved in many different professions will be something to be proud of, something worth celebrating, even.

    I also suggest that we heavily focus on educating ourselves, other Pukhtuns, and especially our youth about our history, our culture, our heritage, and the importance of all of these and everything else related to Pashtuns. So many of us are proud of who we are, but do we know why? We need to ask ourselves what makes us a proud race, and if we cannot explain it to ourselves or to someone else, then that’s a mighty sad sign that we lack knowledge about our own people. We have a beautiful history, and we should make sure to pass it on to our children so it can be kept alive; so our later generations avoid repeating the mistakes that we are making today or that our ancestors made in the past; so that we can successfully move towards the future, knowing that we are carving our footprints in the stones of our present while studying those of our past.

    It is time to act and time to wake up. It is time to get united. It is time for us to use all our energies to help our Pashtun brothers and sisters in this time of depression. It is time to provide support in any way possible to our oppressed people in need. It is time to write, to get involved, to donate, to help, to provide support, and to do anything else we can to get ourselves out of our miseries.

    That’s all I’ve got to say. I wish all of us – along with the rest of humanity – peace, prosperity, and unity; may we be successful in using our means, knowledge, and time in helping those who need us when they need us. Aameen!
    is this your leek...?????
    I am so impressed.....keep it on .

    I do agree with your points..this is the time to bring the unity to our scatered society and antion..we are on the verge of extenction as a natiuon..we are pushed into such a Black whole where we would never be able to get back if we did not show our commentment, didication, nationalism on vigilent way.

    There is no way we can stay like this...We got to find some way out of it.
    We got to compromise with our other brothers on the way inorder to achieve some sustainablity and peace..
    We need a brand new approach with a brand new leadership..

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gharsanay
    is this your leek...?????
    I am so impressed.....keep it on .

    I do agree with your points..this is the time to bring the unity to our scatered society and antion..we are on the verge of extenction as a natiuon..we are pushed into such a Black whole where we would never be able to get back if we did not show our commentment, didication, nationalism on vigilent way.

    There is no way we can stay like this...We got to find some way out of it.
    We got to compromise with our other brothers on the way inorder to achieve some sustainablity and peace..
    We need a brand new approach with a brand new leadership..
    Gharsaniya, manana. Leadership begins at home, just like everything else. We must first therefore ask ourselves if we have leaders at home -- whether they be ourselves, our siblings, or our parents. By a leader in this case, I mean someone who sets priorities for her/his family, so that the youth doesn't grow up confused and get lost eventually. As I mentioned in the piece, we lack knowledge of our own history. How can we stand up for unity then? Most Pashtuns in Pakistan hold a terribly negative view of Pashtuns in Afghanistan; some even mock them. The Afghan/Pashtun attire is referred to as "da Kaabulyanu jaamey"; women who come to our areas and sell bangri and cloth and such are referred to as "changanryaan," and children are warned not to leave their homes in the afternoon time in summer because changanryaan will takhtawal them. Everyone from Afghanistan in our ignorant minds is Kabaley ao Changanrey.
    What's up with that? And because calling someone a Kabaley or Changanray is an *insult*, an abuse, what does that say about the Pashtuns in parts of Pukhtunkhwa?

    So when as children, we observe such negativity towards other Pukhtuns, just because they don't live in Swat or Dir or Mardaan or other nearby region close to us, what hope does that give for our unity anywhere in the future? If our parents/elders instead taught us our history and emphasized Pukhtuns and Pukhtunwali, we wouldn't have that problem. All Pashtuns, regardless of their locations, would be one and the same to us, and we'd have equal respect for all of them.
    If our parents/elders made sure that they knew what language was being enforced in our schools as the basic means of communication, we'd hold more strongly to our language as well. (During my last year in Swat, we were not allowed to speak Pukhto in our school, even though ALL of the students, teachers, and principles were Pukhtuns; no one ever spoke up to say it's not fair to Pukhtuns that we can't speak our own language in our own schools on our own soil.) Tyrants know that the best way to eradicate a people, an ethnic group, off the face of the earth is to attack their language. Their methods of attacking it may be different. Some may be smart and cunning and claim, "We just want you to speak Urdu because Urdu it's your national language, that's all. And we want every 'Pakistani' to be united under one language. More languages will disunite us and make us weaker." Others will just directly start killing those who speak the language they don't wanna hear spoken anymore.

    We have to focus on one thing at a time, I'm thinking. I think we should start with speaking, teaching, promoting our language to all Pukhtuns and always avoiding speaking other languages when with them. We have to develop love for our language, which is our everything, really. And then start discussing our past with others around us, whether our elders or friends or our youth. If we can somehow turn the stories of our great leaders into "bed time stories," it'd be great as well, no? Just whatever we can do to make sure they're aware of at least parts of their history so that they can grow up to understand the importance of the unity of *all* Pukhtuns and have equal respect for all of them.

  8. #8
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    Wow great that is exactly the case with us.
    I think I have writen this incidence somewhere else here before, but to augment your arguements let me desribe it again.
    I was doing my House job at KTH, once a Pakhtun Doc from Kachagahrdae referred a patient with a writtent note kind of short dishcarge summary in pure Pashtu with Latin abrev. as universal tradition in med.field.
    The Pashtun Docs I was rounding with started making fun of the letter. I realized quickly that they are not making fun of the contents of the letter rather the language in which it was written..
    I asked the senior registerar, and inquired if there ws anything wrong with his management and approach..and the answer I got was no..but they sill continued to make fun of it..
    I told them that they were making fun of their mothers and her tongue, because it was not written in English..it a bid disrespect to you mother as well..
    See we have so badly deviated from our culture our language and culture, that even our subconsiouse denies to recognise it...
    It was a systematic butchering of nation and its values...if Pakhtun still sleeping...May God help them..otherwise they are left with an empty and hallow skeltons without any structure or organ..

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